Socialising

Two men walking in woods

Human beings are inherently social creatures. Social groups provide us with an important part of our identity, and more than that, they teach us a set of skills that help us to live our lives. Feeling socially connected, especially in an increasingly isolated world, is more important than ever. 

Social connections can:

  • Improve your quality of life 
  • Boost your mental health
  • Help you live longer

When you became a carer your social circle may have decreased, you have less time on your hands and other priorities. You may have had to reduce hours at work or leave your employment altogether where you had lots of social connections which have now disappeared. The extra costs of caring and fall in income many carers face may mean you cannot afford social activities anymore. It can also feel like no-body understands your situation which amplifies feelings of loneliness and social isolation. 

The desire for social connections is inherent in us all but that does not mean maintaining or gaining new friendships is easy. Developing and maintaining good friendships takes effort. The enjoyment and comfort friendship can provide, however, makes the investment worthwhile. 

Its important to recognise that the number of friends you have is irrelevant, the quality of the friendships and the reciprocal love and support you can get from good friends is what counts. Don't be afraid to lose 'friends' as well as finding the strength be open and honest about your changing circumstances to the ones worth investing in. 

This might be a good time to stop and reflect on what you want from social connections? Is it somebody to talk to who you can relate to about a specific thing such as your caring role. Is it escapism, somebody you can connect with who you can do an activity with? Identifying your own interests and hobbies is a great place to start.  What kind of personalities are you naturally comfortable around?

It's never too late to build new friendships or reconnect with old friends. Investing time in making friends and strengthening your friendships can pay off in better health and a brighter outlook for years to come.

Two people meeting over coffee
How can I make new social connections?

This video from Be More Us was launched in 2018 by the charity Campaign to End Loneliness. The Campaign to End Loneliness was founded in 2011, and was the first organisation in the UK dedicated to tackling loneliness. The video highlights how easy it can be to make new social connections if we had the inhibitions of a child. Take a look at some tips and ideas from the Campaign to End Loneliness if you are feeling lonely.

If you are aged 50 plus and live in Middlesbrough you can find a wide range of social activities including sports groups, art and craft clubs and coffee mornings. Ageing Better Middlesbrough is aimed at reducing social isolation and loneliness. The team have have compiled a database of activities in your area. You can also self refer to their telephone befriending service for a regular friendly chat with one of their supportive team members. 

Carers groups

Everyone is different, and carers all have different needs for support, so there must be a range of options available. Peer support from people who understand can help many carers feel less alone, for example through a carer support group or social activities organised by a local carers organisation. Many local organisations provide peer support groups and friendship groups to encourage carers to come together in a safe and confidential space. Here are a couple of organisations that can help if you want to access groups through carers services:

Carers Together provide a range of activities for local carers to engage with (currently being delivered through Zoom) from singalongs and bingo to resilience and wellbeing workshops. You can see all their activities on their website calendar

The Junction Foundation's young carers service provide group work and social activities to build skills, peer networks friendships, confidence and self belief. 

Kinship Active provides a supportive environment allowing kinship families to get more active together whilst making new connections. Families have access to project workers, free or low-cost local activities and a peer support network.

Some aspects of caring can also be very difficult to share with others, even when talking to someone who understands. You may feel more comfortable opening up in online groups such as the forum provided by Carers UK

Volunteering

A great way to meet new people is through volunteering. It strengthens your ties to the community and broadens your support network, exposing you to people with common interests, neighbourhood resources, and fun and fulfilling activities.

Middlesbrough Volunteer Centre can support you in your volunteering journey and help you find the right opportunity for you. Contact the team by phone: 01642 803613 or Email: volunteer.centre@mvdauk.org.uk